Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Knowing When to Use Absolute References
What if the cell references in D2 contain absolute references, like this?
=$B$2*$C$2
In this case, copying the formula to the cells below produces incorrect results. The formula in cell
D3 is exactly the same as the formula in cell D2 and returns the total for Chairs, not Desks.
Now extend the example to calculate sales tax. The sales tax rate is stored in cell B7 (see Figure
69-2). In this situation, the formula in cell E2 is
=D2*$B$7
Figure 69-2: Formula references to the sales tax cell should be absolute.
The Total is multiplied by the tax rate stored in cell B7. Notice that the reference to B7 is an
absolute reference, and this reference will not change when you copy the cell. When the formula in E2
is copied to the cells below, cell E3 contains this formula:
=D3*$B$7
The reference to cell D2 is adjusted, but the reference to cell B7 is not — which is exactly what
you want.
 
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