Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Knowing When to Use Mixed References
Knowing When to Use Mixed References
In the previous tip, I discuss absolute versus relative cell references. This tip covers an additional
type of cell reference: In a mixed cell reference, either the column part or the row part of a
reference is absolute (and therefore doesn’t change when the formula is copied and pasted). Mixed
cell references aren’t used often, but as you see in this tip, in some situations, using mixed
references makes your job much easier.
An absolute cell reference contains two dollar signs. A mixed cell reference contains, by
comparison, only one dollar sign. Here are two examples of mixed references:
=$A1
=A$1
In the first example, the column part of the reference (A) is absolute, and the row part (1) is
relative. In the second example, the column part of the reference is relative, and the row part is
absolute.
Figure 70-1 shows a worksheet demonstrating a situation in which using mixed references is the
best choice.
Figure 70-1: Using mixed cell references.
The formulas in the table calculate the area for various lengths and widths. Here’s the formula in
cell C3:
=$B3*C$2
 
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