Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Advanced Counting Formulas
Because you have to repeat the And portion of the criteria in each function’s arguments, using
COUNTIFS can produce long formulas with more criteria. When you have a lot of criteria, it
makes sense to use an array formula, like this one that produces the same result:
{=SUM((Month=”January”)*((SalesRep=”Brooks”)+(SalesRep=”Cook”)))}
Counting the most frequently occurring entry
Excel’s MODE function returns the most frequently occurring value in a range. Figure 7-3 shows a
worksheet with values in range A1:A10 (named Data ). The formula that follows returns 10 because
that value appears most frequently in the Data range:
=MODE(Data)
The formula returns an #N/A error if the Data range contains no duplicated values.
Figure 7-3: The MODE function returns the most frequently occurring value in a range.
To count the number of times the most frequently occurring value appears in the range (in other
words, the frequency of the mode), use the following formula:
=COUNTIF(Data,MODE(Data))
This formula returns 5 because the modal value (10) appears five times in the Data range.
The MODE function works only for numeric values, and it ignores cells that contain text. To find
the most frequently occurring text entry in a range, you need to use an array formula.
To count the number of times the most frequently occurring item (text or values) appears in a
range named Data, use the following array formula:
{=MAX(COUNTIF(Data,Data))}
 
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