Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Working with Tables
You can also combine row and column references by nesting brackets and including multiple
references separated by commas. The following example returns Sales from the current row divided
by the total sales:
=Table2[[@],[Sales]]/Table2[[#Totals],[Sales]]
A formula like the preceding one is much easier to create if you use the pointing method.
Table 9-1 summarizes the row identifiers for table references and also describes which ranges
they represent.
Table 9-1: Table Row References
Row Identifier
Description
#All
Returns the range that includes the Header row, all data rows, and the Total row.
#Data
Returns the range that includes the data rows but not the Header and Total rows.
#Headers
Returns the range that includes the Header row only. Returns the #REF! error if
there is no Header row.
#Totals
Returns the range that includes the Total row only. Returns the #REF! error if there
is no Total row.
@
Represents “this row.” Returns the range that is the intersection of the active row
and the table’s data rows. If the active row does not intersect with the table or it’s
the same row as the Header or Total row, the #VALUE! error is returned.
You can use the SUBTOTAL function to generate consecutive numbers for nonhidden
rows in a filtered table. The numbering will adjust as you apply filtering to hide or
display rows. If your table has the field names in row 1, enter this formula in cell A2 and
then copy it down for each row in your table:
=SUBTOTAL(3,B$2:B2)
Converting a table to a worksheet database
If you need to convert a table back to a normal worksheet database, just select a cell in the table
and choose Table Tools
Convert To Range. The table style formatting remains
intact, but the range no longer functions as a table.
Design
Tools
Formulas inside and outside the table that use structured table references are converted, so they
use range addresses rather than table items.
 
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