Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Rounding Numbers
The second argument for the ROUND function can also be negative. In such a case, the number is
rounded to the left of the decimal point. The following formula, for example, returns 120.00:
=ROUND(123.37,–1)
The ROUND function rounds either up or down. But how does it handle a number such as 12.5,
rounded to no decimal places? You’ll find that the ROUND function rounds such numbers away
from zero. The formula that follows, for instance, returns 13.0:
=ROUND(12.5,0)
The next formula returns –13.00 (the rounding occurs away from zero):
=ROUND(–12.5,0)
To force rounding to occur in a particular direction, use the ROUNDUP or ROUNDDOWN
functions. The following formula, for example, returns 12.0. The value rounds down.
=ROUNDDOWN(12.5,0)
The formula that follows returns 13.0. The value rounds up to the nearest whole value.
=ROUNDUP(12.43,0)
Rounding to the nearest multiple
The MROUND function is useful for rounding values to the nearest multiple. For example, you can
use this function to round a number to the nearest 5. The following formula returns 135:
=MROUND(133,5)
Rounding currency values
Often, you need to round currency values. For example, you may need to round a dollar amount
to the nearest penny. A calculated price may be something like $45.78923. In such a case, you’ll
want to round the calculated price to the nearest penny. This may sound simple, but there are
actually three ways to round such a value:
 
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