Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Taking Advantage of Subdatasheets
and Orders tables, for example, you can display the Customers table and use
the subdatasheet feature to see the data from the Orders table showing you
when a customer has placed an order. When a relationship is defined with
the Order Details table, you can expand the subdatasheet display to another
level and see the items that the customer ordered.
Figure 1-17 shows a datasheet with two levels of subdatasheets. The main
datasheet shows the names and addresses of customers. The first-level
subdatasheet lists order information; the second-level subdatasheet lists
order details (items ordered).
Figure 1-17:
This table
displays
two levels
of
subdatasheets.
Queries also may have subdatasheets. See Book I, Chapter 3, and Book II,
Chapter 6 for more information on relationships.
When a subdatasheet is available, you see a plus sign (+) in the first column
of the table. Click the plus sign to see the subdatasheet. When the
subdatasheet opens, the plus sign changes to a minus sign (–). Click the minus
sign to remove the subdatasheet. By default, subdatasheets display for a
single record in the parent table. To display all data from the related table,
click the More button in the Records group on the Home tab of the Ribbon,
and choose Subdatasheets Expand All. To hide all subdatasheets, click
the More button in the Records group on the Home tab of the Ribbon, and
choose Subdatasheets Collapse All.
When a subdatasheet is displayed, you can use it as you would use a table —
to view, format, enter, edit, or delete data.
Access determines which table to display as a subdatasheet based on the
relationships you define in the database. You can select a table or query to
be used as a subdatasheet on the Table property sheet. (Display the table in
Design view, and click the Property Sheet button on the Design tab of the
Ribbon.)
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