Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Seeing How Forms and Reports Are Secretly Related
Table 1-1 (continued)
Button
Name
What It Does
Where to Find
More Info
Navigation
button
Creates
switchboardlike forms with
buttons that display
any form or report
you want.
Chapter 3 of this
minibook
More Forms
button; then
choose
Multiple
Items
Creates a
datasheetlike columnar form.
“More
superspeedy forms,”
later in this chapter
More Forms
button; then
choose
Datasheet
Creates a form
designed to be
viewed in Datasheet
view rather than
Form view.
“More
superspeedy forms,”
later in this chapter
More Forms
button; then
choose Split
Form
Creates a form that
includes a regular
form at the top and a
datasheet below it.
“More
superspeedy forms,”
later in this chapter
More Forms
button; then
choose
Modal Dialog
Creates a form that
keeps the focus. You
must close this form
to return where you
came from. The form
is often confused
with a dialog box.
“More
superspeedy forms,”
later in this chapter
Whoa! Wait a minute. The Forms group used to have two additional
buttons: PivotChart and PivotTable. What happened to them? As it turns out,
those two form types were very rarely used. With Access 2013, Microsoft
has addressed one of the major criticisms of its products: Each succeeding
version of a product contains more and more functions, which are often
hard to learn, take up space in memory and on disk, and slow load times. To
move away from the unglamorous description of its products as bloatware,
Microsoft decided to trim unnecessary features in a bid to improve
performance. You see other examples of this slimming-down process here and
there throughout the topic as we discuss the various parts of Access 2013.
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