Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Zooming In and Out
And, as if that weren’t enough, you also see how to add comments to cells,
assign descriptive, English-type names to cell ranges (like Hollywood_and_Vine!),
and use the Find and Replace commands to locate and, if necessary, replace
entries anywhere in the worksheet. Finally, you see how to control when Excel
recalculates the worksheet and how to limit where changes can be made.
Zooming In and Out
So what to do when trying to edit the company’s huge spreadsheet on your
fancy new Microsoft Surface Pro tablet with its not-so-generous 10.6-inch
screen or even on your 14-inch screen laptop? Does this mean that you’re
doomed to straining your eyes to read all the information in those tiny cells,
or you’re scrolling like mad trying to locate a table you can’t seem to find?
Never fear, the Zoom feature is here in the form of the Zoom slider on the
Status bar. You can use the Zoom slider to quickly increase the magnification
of part of the worksheet or shrink it down to the tiniest size.
You can use the Zoom slider on the Status bar of the Excel window in several
ways, depending upon the device you’re using:
Drag the Zoom slider button to the left or the right on the slider to
decrease or increase the magnification percentage (with 10%
magnification being the lowest percentage when you drag all the way to the left
on the slider and 400% magnification being the highest percentage when
you drag all the way to the right).
Click the Zoom Out (with the minus sign) or the Zoom In button (with
the plus sign) at either end of the slider to decrease or increase the
magnification percentage by 10%.
Use the stretch-and-pinch gesture with your thumb and forefinger on
your touchscreen device to quickly zoom in and out on the cells of your
worksheet and move the Zoom slider at the same time.
In Figure 6-1, you can see a blowup of the worksheet after increasing it to
200% magnification (twice the normal size). To blow up a worksheet like this,
drag the Zoom slider button to the right until 200% appears on the Status bar
to the left of the slider. (You can also do this by clicking View Zoom and
then clicking the 200% button in the Zoom dialog box, if you really want to
go to all that trouble.) One thing’s for sure: You don’t have to go after your
glasses to read the names in those enlarged cells! The only problem with
200% magnification is that you can see only a few cells at one time.
In Figure 6-2, check out the same worksheet, this time at 40%magnification.
To reduce the display to this magnification, you drag the Zoom slider button
to the left until 40% appears on the Status bar in front of the slider.
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