Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Putting on the Protection
4. Click OK or press Enter.
If you type a password in the Password to Unprotect Sheet text box,
Excel opens the Confirm Password dialog box. Re-enter the password in
the Reenter Password to Proceed text box exactly as you typed it in the
Password to Unprotect Sheet text box in the Protect Sheet dialog box
and then click OK or press Enter.
If you want to go a step further and protect the layout of the worksheets in
the workbook, you protect the entire workbook as follows:
1. Click the Protect Workbook command button in the Changes group on
the Ribbon’s Review tab or press Alt+RPW.
Excel opens the Protect Structure and Windows dialog box, where the
Structure check box is selected and the Windows check box is not
selected. With the Structure check box selected, Excel won’t let you mess
around with the sheets in the workbook (by deleting them or rearranging
them). If you want to protect any windows that you set up (as I describe
in Chapter 7), you need to select the Windows check box as well.
2. To assign a password that must be supplied before you can remove
the protection from the worksheet, type the password in the Password
(Optional) text box.
3. Click OK or press Enter.
If you type a password in the Password (Optional) text box, Excel opens
the Confirm Password dialog box. Re-enter the password in the Reenter
Password to Proceed text box exactly as you typed it into the Password
(Optional) text box in the Protect Structure and Windows dialog box and
then click OK or press Enter.
Selecting the Protect Sheet command makes it impossible to make further
changes to the contents of any of the locked cells in that worksheet, except
for those options that you specifically exempt in the Allow All Users of This
Worksheet To list box. (See Step 2 in the first set of steps in this section.)
Selecting the Protect Workbook command makes it impossible to make
further changes to the layout of the worksheets in that workbook.
Excel displays an alert dialog box with the following message when you try to
edit or replace an entry in a locked cell:
The cell or chart you are trying to change is on a
protected sheet.
To make changes, click Unprotect Sheet in the Review
Tab (you might need a password).
Usually, your intention in protecting a worksheet or an entire workbook is
not to prevent all changes but to prevent changes in certain areas of the
worksheet. For example, in a budget worksheet, you may want to protect all
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