Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Doing the Data-Entry Thing
After you finish typing your cell entry, you still have to get it into the cell so
that it stays put. When you do this, you also change the program from Enter
mode back to Ready mode so that you can move the cell pointer to another
cell and, perhaps, enter or edit the data there.
To complete your cell entry and, at the same time, get Excel out of Enter
mode and back into Ready mode, you can select the Enter button on the
Formula bar or press the Enter key or one of the arrow keys (↓, ↑, →, or ←)
on your physical or virtual keyboard. You can also press the Tab key or
Shift+Tab keys to complete a cell entry.
When you complete a cell entry with any of the keyboard keys — Enter, Tab,
Shift+Tab, or any of the arrow keys — you not only complete the entry in the
current cell but get the added advantage of moving the cell pointer to a
neighboring cell in the worksheet that requires editing or data entry.
Now, even though each of these alternatives gets your text into the cell, each
does something a little different afterward, so please take note:
If you select the Enter button (the one with the check mark) on the
Formula bar, the text goes into the cell, and the cell pointer just stays in
the cell containing the brand-new entry.
If you press the Enter key on your physical or virtual keyboard, the text
goes into the cell, and the cell pointer moves down to the cell below in
the next row.
If you press one of the arrow keys, the text goes into the cell, and the
cell pointer moves to the next cell in the direction of the arrow. Press
↓, and the cell pointer moves below in the next row just as it does when
you finish off a cell entry with the Enter key. Press → to move the cell
pointer right to the cell in the next column; press ← to move the cell
pointer left to the cell in the previous column; and press ↑ to move the
cell pointer up to the cell in the next row above.
If you press Tab, the text goes into the cell, and the cell pointer moves
to the adjacent cell in the column on the immediate right (the same as
pressing the → key). If you press Shift+Tab, the cell pointer moves to the
adjacent cell in the column on the immediate left (the same as pressing
the ← key) after putting in the text.
No matter which of the methods you choose when putting an entry in its place,
as soon as you complete your entry in the current cell, Excel deactivates the
Formula bar by removing the Cancel and Enter buttons. Thereafter, the data
you entered continues to appear in the cell in the worksheet (with certain
exceptions that I discuss later in this chapter), and every time you put the cell
pointer into that cell, the data will reappear on the Formula bar as well.
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