Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Session 4.1
you use when you know only part of a value or when you want to start or end with a spe-
cific character or match a certain pattern. Figure 4-9 shows the wildcard characters you
can use when finding data.
Wildcard characters
Figure 4-9
Wildcard Character
Purpose
Example
*
Match any number of
th* finds the, that, this, therefore, and so on
characters. It can be used as
the first and/or last character
in the character string.
?
Match any single alphabetic
a?t finds act, aft, ant, apt, and art
character.
[]
Match any single character
a[fr]t finds aft and art but not act, ant, and apt
within the brackets.
!
Match any character not
a[!fr]t finds act, ant, and apt but not aft and art
within brackets.
-
Match any one of a range of
a[d-p]t finds aft, ant, and apt but not act and art
characters. The range must
be in ascending order (a to z,
not z to a).
#
Match any single numeric
#72 finds 072, 172, 272, 372, and so on
character.
Elsa wants to view the position records for two employers: George’s Restaurant &
Galley (EmployerID 10180) and Moondance Inn & Ski Resort (EmployerID 10185). Matt
Griffin, the manager of recruitment, knows of some student recruits with prior work expe-
rience who are interested in working for these employers. Elsa wants to see which posi-
tions, if any, require experience. You’ll use the * wildcard character to search for these
employers’ positions.
To find the records using the * wildcard character:
1. Click 10145 in the Find What text box to select the entire value, and then type 1018* .
Access will match any field value in the EmployerID field that starts with the digits 1018.
2. Click the Find Next button. Access displays record 64, which is the first record found for
EmployerID 10185. Note that the Experience field value is unchecked, indicating that this
position does not require experience.
3. Click the Find Next button. Access displays record 25, which is the first record found for
EmployerID 10180. Again, the Experience field value is unchecked.
4. Click the Find Next button. Access displays record 42, which is the second record found
for EmployerID 10185. In this case, the Experience field value is checked, indicating that
this position requires prior work experience.
5. Click the Find Next button. Access displays a dialog box informing you that the search is
finished.
6. Click the OK button to close the dialog box.
7. Click the Cancel button to close the Find and Replace dialog box.
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