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Fig. 6.3 Example of a Scatterplot for a Low, Positive Correlation (r
¼þ
.23)
Fig. 6.4 Example of a Scatterplot for a Low, Negative Correlation (r ¼ .22)
no relationship between X and Y and the “picture” drawn around the data points
would be a perfect circle in shape, indicating that you cannot use X to predict Y
because these two variables are not correlated with one another.
Fig. 6.4 shows the scatterplot for a low, negative correlation of r
.22 which
means that each X is a poor predictor of Y in an inverse relationship, meaning that
as X increases, Y decreases (see Fig. 6.4 ). In this case, it is a negative correlation
because the “football” you could draw around the data points slopes down and to
the right.
Fig. 6.5 shows the scatterplot for a moderate, negative correlation of r
¼
.39
which means that X is a moderately good predictor of Y, although there is an
inverse relationship between X and Y (i.e., as X increases, Y decreases; see
¼
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