Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
5.1.9.2 Writing the Conclusion of the Two-group t-Test When You Reject
the Null Hypothesis and Accept the Research Hypothesis
Objective: To write the conclusion of the two-group t-test when you have
rejected the null hypothesis and accepted the research hypothesis
Let’s continue with this same example, but with the result that we reject the null
hypothesis and accept the research hypothesis.
Let’s assume that this time you have alumni data on 85 males and their mean
score on this question was 7.26 with a standard deviation of 2.35. Let’s further
suppose that you also have data on 48 females and their mean score on this
question was 4.37 with a standard deviation of 3.26.
Without going into the details of the formulas for the two-group t-test, these
data would produce the following result and conclusion based on Fig. 5.5 :
Fig. 5.5 Worksheet data for
item #10 for obtaining a
significant difference between
males and females
Null Hypothesis: l 1 = l 2
Research Hypothesis: l 1 = l 2
degrees of freedom:
131
critical t:
1.96 (in Appendix E)
t-test formula:
5.40 (when you use your calculator!)
Result:
Since the absolute value of 5.40 is greater than the critical
t of 1.96, we reject the null hypothesis and accept the
research hypothesis
Now, you need to compare the ratings of the men and women to find out which
group had the more positive rating of their academic experience using the
following rule:
Rule: To summarize the conclusion of the two-group t-test, just compare the
means of the two groups, and be sure to use the word ‘‘significantly’’ in
your conclusion if you rejected the null hypothesis and accepted the
research hypothesis.
A good way to prepare to write the conclusion of the two-group t-test when
you are using a rating scale is to place the mean scores of the two groups on a
drawing of the scale so that you can visualize the difference of the mean scores.
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