Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Setting Up Your Layout with Page Backgrounds and Columns
ChAPTER 6
Setting Up Your Layout with Page
Backgrounds and Columns
The Nature of Complex Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Layout and Design Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Designing Backgrounds and Watermarks. . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Adding Columns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
What’s Next? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Whether you ever had to create documents on a Smith-Corona typewriter—or worse,
a typesetting system!—or you started using word processing on the PC, chances
are that you take some of the benefits of electronic documents for granted. When
you open a new file, you can just begin typing, letting the ideas low as they will. The basic
function of the program lays out the text for you and, later, reformats it according to your
wishes as you choose bullet lists, numbered lists, and columns to display your text.
This chapter takes a closer look at some of the layout fundamentals that occur at the basic
level of formatting in your document. We’ll consider layout options, page background and
design, watermarks, and columns. Along the way, you’ll get a chance to think through how
some of these cornerstones of document design will be reflected in the projects you create.
The Nature of Complex Documents
Not all long documents are complex, and not all complex documents are long. But
whenever you think about putting together either a project that has a number of different parts
or a document that includes many pages and special formats, you’ve got a number of
issues to consider. Which elements should you include? How will you handle them? In what
formats should you save the content so that it can be used again later? Will you work on
the project by yourself or with a team?
The following ideas help you envision the document project that stretches before you.
Whether ultimately you’re planning for print or PDF, solo or on a team, thinking through
the end result now is a good way to ensure you’ll actually get there.
Get a clear vision of the project. If the document you’re in charge of preparing is
an elaborate annual report, a training manual, a corporate policy statement, or
something similar that requires the input of many people, most likely everyone involved
will have an opinion about the way it should look and what it should contain.
Establishing early on what message you want to communicate in the document, what you
want to leave the reader thinking at the end, and what kind of impression you want
to make will be critical to ending up at the right place—and on speaking terms with
the entire team.
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