Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
APPENDIX A Project Planning Guidelines
Appendix A
Project Planning
Guidelines
Using Project Planning Guidelines
The process of communicating specifi c information to others is a learned, rational skill.
Computers and software, especially Microsoft Offi ce 2007, can help you develop ideas and
present detailed information to a particular audience.
Using Microsoft Offi ce 2007, you can create projects such as Word documents,
Excel spreadsheets, Access databases, and PowerPoint presentations. Computer hardware
and productivity software such as Microsoft Offi ce 2007 minimizes much of the laborious
work of drafting and revising projects. Some communicators handwrite ideas in note-
books, others compose directly on the computer, and others have developed unique
strategies that work for their own particular thinking and writing styles.
No matter what method you use to plan a project, follow specifi c guidelines to
arrive at a fi nal product that presents information correctly and effectively (Figure A–1).
Use some aspects of these guidelines every time you undertake a project, and others as
needed in specifi c instances. For example, in determining content for a project, you may
decide that a bar chart communicates trends more effectively than a paragraph of text. If
so, you would create this graphical element and insert it in an Excel spreadsheet, a Word
document, or a PowerPoint slide.
Determine the Project’s Purpose
Begin by clearly defi ning why you are
undertaking this assignment. For example,
you may want to track monetary donations
collected for your club’s fundraising drive.
Alternatively, you may be urging students
to vote for a particular candidate in the next
election. Once you clearly understand the
purpose of your task, begin to draft ideas of
how best to communicate this information.
PROJECT PLANNING GUIDELINES
1. DETERMINE THE PROJECT’S PURPOSE
Why are you undertaking the project?
2. ANALYZE YOUR AUDIENCE
Who are the people who will use your work?
3. GATHER POSSIBLE CONTENT
What information exists, and in what forms?
Analyze your Audience
Learn about the people who will
read, analyze, or view your work. Where
are they employed? What are their educa-
tional backgrounds? What are their
expectations? What questions do they have?
4. DETERMINE WHAT CONTENT TO
PRESENT TO YOUR AUDIENCE
What information will best communicate the project’s
purpose to your audience?
Figure A–1
 
 
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