Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
CREATING A SECONDARY VALUE AXIS
value axis. Each series is associated with either the primary or the secondary value
axis. Why use two value axes? Two value axes are most often used when the data
being plotted varies drastically in scale.
CREATING A SECONDARY VALUE AXIS
Figure 3-24 shows a line chart with two data series: Income and Profit Margin.
Compared to the Income value, the Profit Margin numbers are so small that they
barely show up in the chart. This is a good candidate for a secondary value axis.
To add a secondary value axis:
1. Select the Profit Margin series in the chart.
2. Select Format
Selected Data Series and click the Axis tab in the Format
Data Series dialog box.
3. Choose the Secondary axis option.
A new value axis is added to the right side of the chart, and the Profit Margin
series uses that value axis (see Figure 3-25).
Figure 3-24: The values in the Profit Margin series are so small that they aren’t visible
in the chart.
CREATING A CHART WITH FOUR AXES
Very few situations warrant a chart with four axes. The problem, of course, is that
using four axes almost always causes the chart to be difficult to understand. An
exception is XY charts. Figure 3-26 shows an XY chart that has two series, and the
series vary quite a bit in magnitude on both dimensions. If the objective is to
compare the shape of the lines, this chart does not do a very good job because most of
the chart consists of white space. Using four axes might solve the problem.
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