Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Plotting mathematical functions
Follow these steps to create the box plot:
1. Select the range F10:J15 and use the Chart Wizard to create a
stackedcolumn chart.
2. In Step 2 of the Chart Wizard, select the Rows option. Click Finish to
create the chart.
3. Select Series 1 and access the Format Data Series dialog box. In the
Patterns tab, set the Border to None and the Area to None.
4. Select Series 2 and access the Format Data Series dialog box. In the
Patterns tab, set the Border to None and the Area to None. In the Y Error
Bars tab, specify Minus error bars, with an Error amount of 100%.
5. Select Series 4 and access the Format Data Series dialog box. In the Y
Error Bars tab, specify Plus error bars, with the custom range: G15:J15
(the Series 5 range).
6. Select Series 5 and access the Format Data Series dialog box. In the
Patterns tab, set the Border to None and the Area to None.
7. You’ll probably want to delete the legend because it provides no
meaningful information.
The only two bars that remain visible are Series 3 and Series 4. Vertical error
bars extend to cover the space occupied by the hidden Series 2 and Series 5. You
can adjust the Gap width to adjust the width of the boxes.
You can also create a horizontal box plot by starting with a stacked-bar chart
and using the same series of steps.
The companion CD-ROM contains an additional example that creates a
vertical box plot using a line chart with high-low lines and up/down bars.
Plotting mathematical functions
The examples in this section demonstrate how to plot mathematical functions that
use one variable (a 2-D line chart) and two variables (a 3-D surface chart).
The examples make use of Excel’s Data Table feature, which enables you to
evaluate a formula with varying input values. Coverage of this feature is
beyond the scope of this topic. Excel’s Help provides a good overview.
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