Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Method 2: Destroy the pivot table
3. Activate a cell in an empty area of a worksheet.
4. Choose Edit
Paste Special.
5. In the Paste Special dialog box, select the Values option.
The result will be an exact duplicate of the pivot table, but this will be a static
range — not an actual pivot table. You can then create your chart from this new range.
Method 2: Destroy the pivot table
If you no longer need the interactivity of a pivot table, you can convert it to a
standard range of cells:
1. Select the cells that make up the pivot table.
2. Choose Edit
Copy.
3. Choose Edit
Paste Special.
4. In the Paste Special dialog box, select the Values option.
The pivot table will no longer be a pivot table, and you can create your chart.
Method 3: Drag or copy data into an empty chart
This method requires an empty chart. To create an empty embedded chart:
1. Select any blank cell near the pivot table.
2. Click the Chart Wizard button.
3. Click Finish.
You can then select some of the data in the pivot table and drag or copy it into
the chart. In most cases, the result will be a standard chart. You’ll find, however,
that selecting too much of the pivot table may result in a pivot chart that uses all
the data in the pivot table. It’s not clear (at least to me) how much is “too much.”
Keep in mind that the chart you create still depends on the data in the pivot
chart. Consequently, if the layout of the pivot table is changed, your chart
will continue to use the original range locations — and your chart will
(probably) get very messed up.
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