Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Using mixed references
In the first example, the column part of the reference (A) is absolute, and the row part (1) is relative. In
the second example, the column part of the reference is relative, and the row part is absolute.
Figure 29-2 shows a worksheet demonstrating a situation in which using mixed references is the best
choice.
Figure 29-2: Using mixed cell references.
The formulas in the table calculate the area for various lengths and widths of a rectangle. Here’s the
formula in cell C3:
=$B3*C$2
Notice that both cell references are mixed. The reference to cell B3 uses an absolute reference for the
column ($B), and the reference to cell C2 uses an absolute reference for the row ($2). As a result, this
formula can be copied down and across, and the calculations are correct. For example, the formula in
cell F7 is
=$B7*F$2
If C3 used either absolute or relative references, copying the formula would produce incorrect
results.
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