Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Format Painter variations
Format Painter variations
In Step 1 in the preceding section, if you select a range of cells, you can paint another range by
clicking a single cell. The formatting is copied to a range that’s the same size as the original selection.
In Step 2, if you double-click the Format Painter button, Excel remains in Format Painter mode until
you cancel it. This enables you to copy the format to multiple ranges of cells. To get out of Format
Painter mode, press Esc or click the Format Painter button again.
You can also use the Format Painter to remove all formatting from a range and return the range to its
pristine state. Start by selecting an unformatted cell. Then click the Format Painter button and drag it
over the range.
The Format Painter also works with complete rows and columns. If you start by selecting one or more
complete rows, the Format Painter also copies row height. The same thing occurs with column
widths if you start by selecting one or more columns.
This feature even works with complete worksheets. For example, if you want to remove all
formatting from a worksheet, select an unformatted cell, click the Format Painter button, and then click the
“select all” button at the intersection of the row and column borders.
You can also use the Format Painter with shapes and other objects such as pictures. Just select the
object, click the Format Painter button, and click another object. Figure 21-2 shows an example of
copying shape formats using the Format Painter.
Although the Format Painter is versatile, it doesn’t work with charts.
Note
Figure 21-2: Using the Format Painter to copy shape formatting.
Finally, the Format Painter is a handy tool, but it doesn’t perform any actions that can’t be done via
other methods. For example, you can copy a range, select another range, and use the Home➜
Clipboard➜Paste➜Formatting (R) command to paste the formatting only.
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