Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Understanding operator precedence in formulas
You can, of course, use as many operators as you need to perform the desired calculation.
Here are some examples of formulas that use various operators.
Formula
What it does
=”Part-”&”23A”
Joins (concatenates) the two text strings to produce Part-23A.
=A1&A2
Concatenates the contents of cell A1 with cell A2. Concatenation works
with values as well as text. If cell A1 contains 123 and cell A2 contains
456 , this formula would return the text 123456 .
=6^3
Raises 6 to the third power (216).
=216^(1/3)
Raises 216 to the 1/3 power. This is mathematically equivalent to
calculating the cube root of 216, which is 6.
=A1<A2
Returns TRUE if the value in cell A1 is less than the value in cell A2.
Otherwise, it returns FALSE . Logical comparison operators also work
with text. If A1 contains Bill and A2 contains Julia , the formula would
return TRUE because Bill comes before Julia in alphabetical order.
=A1<=A2
Returns TRUE if the value in cell A1 is less than or equal to the value in
cell A2. Otherwise, it returns FALSE .
=A1<>A2
Returns TRUE if the value in cell A1 isn’t equal to the value in cell A2.
Otherwise, it returns FALSE .
Understanding operator precedence in formulas
When Excel calculates the value of a formula, it uses certain rules to determine the order in
which the various parts of the formula are calculated. You need to understand these rules
so your formulas produce accurate results.
Table 15.2 lists the Excel operator precedence. This table shows that exponentiation has the
highest precedence (performed fi rst) and logical comparisons have the lowest precedence
(performed last).
TABLE 15.2 Operator Precedence in Excel Formulas
Symbol
Operator
Precedence
^
Exponentiation
1
*
Multiplication
2
/
Division
2
15
+
Addition
3
Subtraction
3
&
Concatenation
4
Continues
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