Microsoft Office Tutorials and References
In Depth Information
Gestures and Touch Navigation
Gestures and Touch Navigation
The 2013 version of the Offi ce applications now can be used effectively on touch-enabled
devices in addition to desktop and laptop computers. Although your desktop or notebook
computer will likely remain your primary Offi ce 2013 platform for now, the new
convenience and fl exibility of using Offi ce on a touch-enabled device like a tablet makes that
platform a viable choice for road trips and extra work at home. Here’s a brief introduction
to the touch gestures and their basic uses in Offi ce 2013:
Tap: This is the equivalent of a mouse click. Move your fi nger over the desired item,
and then touch and release, as when pressing a keyboard key. Tap to select buttons
and other interface features and position the insertion point.
Tap-hold: This is the equivalent of right-clicking. Move your fi nger over the desired
item, and then touch and hold as when holding down a keyboard key. For example,
tap-hold a QAT button to display the menu for customizing the QAT.
Double-tap: This is the equivalent of double-clicking. Move your fi nger over the
desired item, and touch and release twice. For example, you can double-tap to zoom
in on graphics in some new views.
Pinch: Drag your thumb and forefi nger together on the screen. Use this action to
zoom out in a document.
Stretch: The opposite of pinch, in this gesture you drag your thumb and forefi nger
apart on the screen. Use this action to zoom in.
Slide: Tap-hold, and then drag your fi nger. The tap-hold generally selects an object,
and then dragging moves it into position.
Swipe: Quickly drag your fi nger on screen, then lift it off. This action also can be
used for scrolling and selecting.
Touch-enabled systems also give you the ability to display an on-screen keyboard for
entering text. Tapping the Touch Keyboard button on the taskbar opens the keyboard. Tap its
Close (X) button to close it when you’ve fi nished entering information.
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Help has a topic called office Touch Guide that provides even more specii cs about navigating and working via touch.
There are some differences in the touch interface, such as the number of default QAT buttons. The screenshots in this
book show the nontouch versions of the office applications, so your screen may look different if you are using touch.
 
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